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20121001
20121031
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CSPAN2 17
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English 17
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 9:00pm EDT
to by the ads in many ways has that changed on decades. the focus is invisible to us. i try to write in this book is taking place with people who don't go on tv and whose names are almost entirely unknown. the outside world has changed dramatically and is changing every year, sometimes every month coming of the campaigns are getting a lot smarter about what they do, why they do it, and i think that the general campaign coverage is struggling to keep up explaining to the voters and the viewers and what they are doing and why and what the sort of thinking is under hurting all of that. >> host: you are talking about it what is causing the victory lap and you have this picture in your mind there is this lab. can you give some perspective in the campaigns now how many people are working on this stuff? was a typical campaign, how many people are working on the campaign and how many people would be working on this sort of data analysis and all the things you're talking about >> guest: the empiricism is informing everything will sort of rigorous experimental methods with her some sort of eve
CSPAN
Oct 1, 2012 12:00am EDT
and in politics, and a lot of those states who are a field director and using the slowly advanced data in 2008 went out and went to state parties or labor unions or institutions on the left and there's a sort of pollination that is taking place that i think a little more active on the democratic side right now than on the republican side. .. and the ore opponents by using data. but there are scrambling to sort of build anything approaching the scaling of the obama campaign and anything approaching l am ambition of the obama campaign. types you can solve in six months are going to be smaller than what you can solve in four years. >> host: doipg you the campaign is going to rely more on messaging or on the targeting techniques. what is is the mix? did does message still matter. is it really if you can fine tune it and target it better. that's going to be the difference. how do you put that all together? >> the message still matters. one of the things, the whole narrative, you know, in the bulk of my book takes ten to fifteen years, has taken place in an era of a real partisan polarization. one o
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 11:00am EDT
in your mind that it is this lap. can you give us some perspective in these campaigns now how many people are working on this stuff? if you can tell us what is a typical campaign, how many people are usually working on this campaign and how many people would be working on this sort of data, analysis and all things you're talking about. >> guest: on some level on smart campaigns and data analysis, pure system is sort of informing everything to do. there's more and more stuff on the campaign to contest that either through rigorous experimental methods or through some sort of come even if it's not randomized, a lot of these extremes are. there some sort of discipline testing. so smart campaign, and the obama campaign is symptomatic of this, basically thinking everything the campaign does is form by david. and you get down to the state level campaigns and they definitely are having people who are voter file managers are basically dealing with data or talking people are just dealing with david. you get up to presidential campaign and one of the things the romney campaign had to do this summer
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2012 10:00pm EDT
language and they say one thing and they will tell us, we are so glad you are here to help us and the other languages something else. all of a sudden boom, it's the person in the crowd maybe even a child. so that is one. there is a language problem. again another issue of the language problem is a car drives by and a soldier on patrol says, stopped. do you understand stop in arabic? no. so the cargoes on, the soldier as is required of him, shoots through the car window, opens the door, finds a woman and a couple of kids dead and starts to cry. how do you feel? guilty? miserable? so that is one side, they don't know who their enemy is or where he is because they not only have improvised explosive devices, but they have something called house borne improvised explosive devices so you may be in a house, searching a house, and boom. there is one buddy carrying another one down the stairs dead, with lead running down his back. very stressful, very stressful. >> host: marguerite, you talk about one young man named noaa pierce you talk about noaa in the story and why you got so involved with this
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 12:00pm EDT
] >> this event is part of the 2012 national book festival in washington d.c. for more information, visit loc.us/books asked. >> coming up, booktv presents "after words," whereby a guess as to what a few authors. this week, legal journalist john jenkins and his book, "the partisan: the life of william rehnquist." and i come to the publisher cq press details the early career in the 33 year supreme court tenure of the former chief justice. he talks a supreme court reporter and the biographer for justices o'connor and scully a, joan biskupic. >> welcome, john jenkins. we're here to talk about your new book, "the partisan: the life of william rehnquist." i'm going to start with one general question, just to give our viewers a sense of the chief justice is and why william rehnquist was important. there's only been 17 cheese, correct? tell us a little bit about the position. what is the chief justice of the united states during the horton of william rehnquist and then we'll go into this chronology. >> guest: welcome to the chief has to rose in the judicial system. this first kind of the chief among eq
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 9:00pm EDT
and, okay, they're speaking in another language, and they say one thing, and they'll tell us we're so glad you're here to help us, and the other language is something else. and all of a sudden, boom, it's the person in the crowd may even be a child. that you'd least expect. so that's one. there's a language problem. again, another issue of the language problem is a car drives by, and a soldier on patrol says, stop. well, do you understand stop in arabic? no. so the car goes on, the soldier -- as is required of him -- shoots through the car window, opens the door, finds a woman and a couple of kids dead and starts to cry. how do you feel? guilty? miserable? so that's one side is you don't know who the enemy is, where he is. because they not only have improvised explosive devices, but they have something called house-borne improvised explosive devices. is -- and so you may be in a house searching a house, and boom. and there's one buddy carrying another one down the stairs dead with blood running down his back. very stressful. very stressful. >> host: marguerite, you talk about one youn
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 9:00pm EDT
was important. there have only been 17 chiefs, correct? >> guest: correct, that's right. >> host: tell us about the position, what does a chief justice of the united states do and the importance of william rehnquist, and then we'll go into his chronology. >> guest: well, the chief is really, he has two roles in the judicial system. he's, first, kind of the chief among equals on the court. he assigns the opinion when he's in the majority, he leads the discussion at conference. so he has a very important role to play among the nine justices, and he's really the key guy there, particularly when he's in the majority. but the other thing that rehnquist was and that the chief is is really the head of the entire administrative office of the u.s. courts. he sort of runs the entire court system, and that's a whole part of his administrative responsibility that the other eight justices don't have. but that's what a chief justice does. >> host: and we'll talk a little bit about how he got into that position, but let's go back to the beginning. wisconsin, a suburb of milwaukee, he was born october 1st, rig
CSPAN
Oct 29, 2012 12:00am EDT
the missiles. trust us we will do it and for the members it wasn't so much trust but verify the to verify first. there wasn't a lot of trust on this issue. he's on the tape talking got the soviet ambassador to the united states was now burned as a source because we can't believe him not because he was lobbying the there were concerns that haven't been told about this. there are concerns about listening to many of the soviet diplomats and then being sent back to life that is what they were doing. but they really have to follow through and get out to verify first. they talk about how this might impact the trippi which history has no parallel. so what they have to do is look at how they can do it and what that involves as american eyes seeing what's happening on the ground. the same weapons into cuba, fidel castro is not going to allow that. the next best thing is sending american surveillance planes over. that in itself is a complicated decision because it had been shot down on october 27th. fidel castro was still threatening to shoot down the plant and they were coming back with bullet holes in
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 10:00pm EDT
, correct? tell us a little bit about the position. what's what's is the chief justice of the united states do in the importance of william rehnquist and then we will go into the chronology. yes go the chief has two roles in the judicial system. he is first the chief among equals on the court. he assigns the opinion when he was a majority and reach the discussion conference so he has a very poor girl to play among the nine justices. he is really the key guy there. particularly when he's in the majority but the other thing that rehnquist was is really the head of hired administration office of the courts, sort of runs the entire court system and that is a whole part of his administrative responsibilities that the other justices don't have so that is what a chief does. >> host: we will talk a little bit how he got into tha position but let's go back to the beginning. the suburb of milwaukee, born october 1 right around this time, 1924. his father was a paper salesman its mother with a homemaker but she was a dominant force in the household, right? tell me a little bit about mrs. rehnquist and
CSPAN
Oct 28, 2012 9:00pm EDT
, the people who get out now have formed -- there are enough of them that they are educating us about truth of our trivia and there's been several books published about life in north korea, and we now have a much better picture of what the truth of the existence is. .. >> you can't even mail a letter so the exiles created a black market in information. they hire chinese couriers to cross the border and deliver messages, or sometimes they deliver chinese cell phones to a north korean relative, tell the relative to go to an area near the border at a certain day and hour, turn on the phone, and receive a phone call from the relative who escaped to a different country. in south korea, north korean exiles formed organizations whose purpose is to get information into north korea, to give just one example, there are four radio stations run by north korean exiles that broadcast daily to north creigh -- north korea. the man tray of the kim family regime that north korea is the greatest, most prosperous nation on earth and that the north korean people are the happiest is being exposed for the lie it
CSPAN
Oct 27, 2012 10:00pm EDT
have got this issue with the soviet premier says we will remove the missiles, trust us we will do it. so the issue is not so much trust and verify that it was verify first. there really wasn't a lot of trust in the issue. kennedy himself is talking about how anatoly who was the investor to the united states we can't believe them not because necessarily he was lying but there were wrote concerns that they haven't been told about this. there are concerns about listening to any of the soviet diplomats. and so kennedy and -- have this promise but they really have to follow through and look at how to verify it. how it might be a massive trick and so what they have to do is look at how they can do it and what it involves. american eyes seeing what's happening on the ground. fidel castro said he's not going to allow that. the next best thing is sending american surveillance planes over. that in itself is a complicated decision because a surveillance plane had been shot down on october 20,207th and fidel castro was threatening to shoot down planes and low-level surveillance planes were comin
CSPAN
Oct 21, 2012 9:00pm EDT
are in trouble. give us the parameters of disasters. >> guest: it starts as an economic argument. men are having a harder time adapting to the economy and women are adapting more easily. i can't tell you why there are different periods had men at devotees year, but then it's education and credentials. the economy as fast changing. who knows what it's going to throw. women seem to be getting those skills and credentials at a much faster rate than men and they seem to be more nimble and that kind filters down into our society, so in the book i talk about how that changes marriage and the notion for father hardee of what men can and can't do and, you know, how young people have sex and make decisions and so you really start to see it having an influence in our culture basically. >> host: give us some of the members. we have heard for so many years there is a crisis with the girls that they learn differently. they are not as strong in math and science and there is emphasis to improve that. it will come as a shock as it did to me to learn that women far outstrip men. the girls and boys and academic p
CSPAN
Oct 28, 2012 11:00am EDT
authors. .. >> host: give us the parameters for that. >> it starts with an economic argument, men have a harder time adapting to the economy and women are adapting more easily. there are periods when men have adapted easily but at this period, education and credentials. economy is fast-changing and who knows what it will throw at us? women are getting those killed and credentials that a faster rate than men are and seem to be more nimble and that filters into our society. in the book i talk about how that changes marriage and notions of fatherhood and what men can or cannot do in families or how young people have sex and make decisions and you start to see it having an influence in our culture basically. >> host: we have heard there's a crisis with girls, they learn their not strong in math and science and bears emphasis on trying to prove that and it will come as a shock that women far outstripped men in academic performance. >> guest: i have a daughter and two sons. it you occasion is the clearest argument. girls do better than boys and now they have equal as 80 scores in math and do
CSPAN
Oct 20, 2012 10:00pm EDT
another. i think doing gives us a history of what strom's america thinks like. and rethink not only what was going on in the south but what was going on in the national conservative political realm. we thinking strom thurmond helps us rethink the history of modern conservative. a history that thurmond is left out of. we only remember him as cartoonish racist fig you from the deep south. . . read the book and i have got parts to argue with on that question, men are in trouble. give us the premise of the disaster. >> host: men are having a harder time adapting to the economy and women are adapting wisely. i can tell you why. just to say to this period entry, then as education and credentials of the kami is fast-changing and who knows what it's going to throw at us. women seems to get getting those credentials at a faster rate than men are and they tend to be more nimble and that filters down into our society so in the book i talk about how that changes marriage and fatherhood in what manner he can and can't do in families and how young people have and make decisions and so you really start
CSPAN
Oct 22, 2012 12:00am EDT
is fast changing, who knows what it throws at us. women are getting those skills and credentials at a faster rate than men are being more nimble filtering into the society. in the book i talk about how that changes marriage and our notions of fatherhood and what men can and can't do in families, young people have sex, make decisions influencing our culture. >> host: give me some of the numbers. we heard for years there's a crisis with girls, they learn differently, not as strong in math and science and emphasis to improve that. it's a shock to learn that women far out perform boys in academic performance. >> i have a son and daughter, and education is the clear education argument. basically girls do better than boys. now they have equal sat scores in math and better in verbal. it starts early in life. that's a developmental question. girls develop faster than boys, and that's where it starts and what people say is boys get a sense of themselves as maybe a little bit of failures in school not because they are less smart because they are just about equally smart. it has to do with
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)